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Husbands create 7 hours of extra housework a week:


Husbands create 7 hours of extra housework a week: study

For married women who can’t figure out why they always have so much housework researchers may have the answer — husbands.

A new study from the University of Michigan shows that having a husband creates an extra seven hours of extra housework a week for women. But a wife saves her husband from an hour of chores around the house each week.

“It’s a well-known pattern. There’s still a significant reallocation of labor that occurs at marriage — men tend to work more outside the home, while women take on more of the household labor,” said Frank Stafford, of the university’s Institute for Social Research (ISR), who directed the study.

“And the situation gets worse for women when they have children,” he added in a statement.

Stafford’s findings are based on 2005 time-diary data from a study on income dynamics that has been conducted since 1968 at ISR.

The researchers studied diaries to assess how people spent their time and questioned men and women about how much time they spend cooking, cleaning and doing basic work around the house.

They found that young single women did the least amount of housework, at about 12 hours a week. Married women in their 60 and 70s did nearly twice that amount, while women with more than three children spent 28 hours a week cleaning, cooking and washing.

But it’s not as bad as it used to be. In 1976 women did an average of 26 hours of housework a week, while men did about six, according to the study,

(Reporting by Patricia Reaney; editing by Belinda Goldsmith

Will Your Cable Box Have A Camera To Watch You?


Comcast Cameras to Start Watching You?

If you have some tinfoil handy, now might be a good time to fashion a hat. At the Digital Living Room conference today, Gerard Kunkel, Comcast’s senior VP of user experience, told me the cable company is experimenting with different camera technologies built into devices so it can know who’s in your living room.

The idea being that if you turn on your cable box, it recognizes you and pulls up shows already in your profile or makes recommendations. If parents are watching TV with their children, for example, parental controls could appear to block certain content from appearing on the screen. Kunkel also said this type of monitoring is the “holy grail” because it could help serve up specifically tailored ads. Yikes…..Read Rest of Story, Watch Video..

Obese People Have Vitamin Deficiency


 This article reminded me of a recent study I read where it was found that Obese people are frequently vitamin deficient. This is contrary to what we believe. We assume that they are over nourished and therefore obese where the exact opposite it true-

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Vitamin Deficiency May Cause Modern Ills

The Independent – London

02-18-08

chronic shortage of vitamins and other “micronutrients” in the diet may be responsible for triggering many of the ills of modern life such as cancer, obesity and the degenerative diseases of ageing.

Professor Bruce Ames, of the University of California, Berkeley, who invented one of the standard tests for cancer-causing chemicals, said many people’s diets were deficient in one or more of the 40 micronutrients essential for a healthy life.

Taking dietary supplements in the form of vitamin pills could help to counteract many of the disorders associated with ageing, Dr Ames told the American Association meeting.

He said many people on a high-calorie diet in the West or poor diet in developing countries were short of micronutrients and this caused the body to go into an emergency “triage” response in which it tried to keep its metabolism in balance by a process of compensation. This ensures immediate survival, but the consequences are an increase in DNA damage, which causes future cancers, a lowered immune defence, and a decay of the mitochondrial “power plants” of the cells, which causes accelerated ageing,” he said.

He said a shortage of minerals, vitamins and other nutrients could also be partly responsible for obesity.

Top 10 Worst Drinks-


This is an informative video that lists the Top 10 worst drinks.  It is about 15 minutes long but well worth it….

Sweet N’ Low” Makes you Big And Fat?


Researchers think the sweetener blunted lab rats’ ability to burn off calories from their regular food portions.
By Denise Gellene, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Casting doubt on the benefit of low-calorie sweeteners, research released Sunday reported that rats on diets containing saccharin gained more weight than rats given sugary food.
The study in the journal Behavioral Neuroscience found that the calorie-free artificial sweetener appeared to break the physiological connection between sweet tastes and calories, driving the rats to overeat.

Lyn M. Steffen, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Minnesota, who was not involved in the latest report, said the study offered a possible explanation for the unexpected association between obesity and diet soda found in recent human studies.Researchers have puzzled over whether diet soda is a marker for poor eating habits or diet soda ingredients cause people to put on pounds, she said. “This rat study suggests a component of the artificial sweetener may be responsible for the weight gain.”

Steffen’s own recent research has shown that people who drink diet soda have a higher risk of developing metabolic syndrome — a cluster of symptoms including obesity — than do people who drink regular soda. Her research was published last month in the American Heart Assn.’s journal Circulation.

An industry group rejected Sunday’s report.

“The causes of obesity are multifactorial,” said a statement by Beth Hubrich, a dietitian with the Calorie Control Council, which represents low- and reduced-calorie food and beverage marketers. “Although surveys have shown that there has been an increase in the use of ‘sugar-free’ foods over the years, portion sizes of foods have also increased, physical activity has decreased and overall calorie intake has increased.”

The number of Americans who consume soda, yogurt and other products containing sugar-free sweeteners more than doubled to 160 million in 2000 from fewer than 70 million in 1987, according to the report. Over the same period, the incidence of obesity among U.S. adults rose to 30% from 15%.

One interpretation of the trends is that people have been turning to lower-calorie foods to control an increasing problem with weight gain.

An alternative interpretation is that artificial sweeteners lead to biological or behavioral changes that cause people to eat more. This possibility is easier to test in rats than in people because scientists can control the animals’ diets and measure exactly what they eat, said the study’s lead author, Susan E. Swithers, an associate professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University in Indiana.

In the experiment, funded by the National Institutes of Health and by Purdue, nine rats received yogurt sweetened with saccharin and eight rats received yogurt sweetened with glucose, which is close in composition to table sugar. After receiving their yogurt snack, the animals were given their usual chow.

At the end of five weeks, rats that had been fed sugar-free yogurt gained an average of 88 grams, compared with 72 grams for rats that dined on glucose-sweetened yogurt, a difference of about 20%. Rats fed sugar-free yogurt were consuming more calories and had 5% more body fat.

In a related experiment, scientists gave the two groups of rats a sugary drink and measured changes in the animals’ body temperatures. Body temperatures typically rise after a meal because it takes energy to digest food.

The rats in the saccharin group experienced a smaller average temperature increase, scientists said — a sign that regular consumption of artificial sweeteners had blunted their body’s response to sweet foods, making it harder for the animals to burn off their extra calories.

Swithers said that normally, sweet tastes signal that the body is about to receive a lot of calories, and the digestive system prepares to react. When sweet tastes aren’t followed by lots of calories, as in the case of artificial sweeteners, the body becomes conditioned against a strong response.

Although the experiment looked only at saccharin, other artificial sweeteners may have the same effect, Swithers said.

A controlled study is needed to determine whether sweeteners have the same effect in people as in rats, she said, but some epidemiological studies have been consistent with her findings.

Swithers’ next step, she said, will be to determine whether dietary changes could reverse the rats’ physiological responses.

Adam Drewnowski, director of the nutrition sciences program at the University of Washington, cautioned against interpreting the results broadly.

“It is unreasonable to claim that results obtained studying saccharin in rats translate to every sweetener in humans,” said Drewnowski, who has received research funding from the beverage industry in the past.

He added: “We now have studies showing that sugar calories are associated with obesity and the absence of sugar is associated with obesity. Pity those people trying to do something about obesity.”

denise.gellene@latimes.com